fault


fault
fault n
1 "imperfection, deficiency, shortcoming
Analogous words: flaw, defect, *blemish: weakness, infirmity (see corresponding adjectives at WEAK)
Antonyms: excellence
2 Fault, failing, frailty, foible, vice are comparable when they mean an imperfection in character or an ingrained moral weakness.
Fault implies failure, but not necessarily serious or even culpable failure, to attain a standard of moral perfection in disposition, deed, or habit
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have many virtues and few faults

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he is all fault who hath no fault at all— Tennyson

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our modern appreciativeness is often only the amiable aspect of a fault—an undue tolerance for indeterminate enthusiasms and vapid emotionalism— Babbitt

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Failing is even less censorious than fault, for it usually implies a shortcoming, often a weakness of character for which one is not entirely responsible or of which one may not be aware
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pride . . . is a very common failing, I believe— Austen

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a knowledge of his family failings will help one man in economizing his estat eQuiller-Couch

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while in other statesmen these failings are usually thought of as sorrowful necessities, in Lloyd George they are commonly held to show his essential nastiness— Sykes

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Frailty often implies a weakness in character which makes one prone to fall when tempted
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God knows our frailty, pities our weakness— Locke

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The term therefore often denotes a pardonable or a petty fault
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a purely human frailty, like a fondness for detective stories— Lowes

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Foible denotes a harmless, sometimes an amiable, sometimes a temperamental, weakness or failing
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I can bear very well to hear my foibles exposed, though not my faultsShenstone

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he had all the foibles of the aesthete— Buchan

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Vice (see also OFFENSE 3) is stronger than fault and failing in its suggestion of violation of the moral law or of giving offense to the moral senses of others, but it does not necessarily imply corruptness or deliberate defiance of the law and may be rather a general term attributable to an imperfection or flaw that impairs the soundness of a character or an ability
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knowledge . . . of all the virtues and vices, tastes and dislikes of all the people— Galsworthy

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she had been proud. She was criminally proud. That was her viceBennett

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as Professor Whitehead has lately said, the intolerant use of abstractions is the major vice of the intellect— Inge

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Analogous words: weakness, infirmity (see corresponding adjectives at WEAK): flaw, defect, *blemish
Antonyms: merit
Contrasted words: *excellence, virtue, perfection
3 dame, culpability, guilt
Analogous words: responsibility, answerability, accountability (see corresponding adjectives at RESPONSIBLE): sin, *offense, crime

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fault — n [Anglo French faute lack, failing, ultimately from Latin fallere to deceive, disappoint] 1: a usu. intentional act forbidden by law; also: a usu. intentional omission to do something (as to exercise due care) required by law see also negligence …   Law dictionary

  • Fault — Fault, n. [OE. faut, faute, F. faute (cf. It., Sp., & Pg. falta), fr. a verb meaning to want, fail, freq., fr. L. fallere to deceive. See {Fail}, and cf. {Default}.] 1. Defect; want; lack; default. [1913 Webster] One, it pleases me, for fault of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fault — [fɔːlt ǁ fɒːlt] noun [countable] 1. MANUFACTURING something that is wrong with a machine, system etc that prevents it from working correctly: fault in • Soviet engineers identified 32 design faults in the reactor, any of which could have led to… …   Financial and business terms

  • fault — [fôlt] n. [ME faute < OFr faulte, a lack < VL * fallita < * fallitus, for L falsus: see FALSE] 1. Obs. failure to have or do what is required; lack 2. something that mars the appearance, character, structure, etc.; defect or failing 3.… …   English World dictionary

  • Fault — may refer to:*Fault (geology), planar rock fractures which show evidence of relative movement *Fault (technology), an abnormal condition or defect at the component, equipment, or sub system level which may lead to a failure *An asymmetric fault… …   Wikipedia

  • fault — FÁULT, faulturi, s.n. (La unele jocuri sportive) Act nesportiv (lovire intenţionată, trântire, împingere etc.) comis de un jucător asupra adversarului şi sancţionat de arbitru. [pr.: fa ult] – Din engl. fault. Trimis de RACAI, 21.11.2003. Sursa:… …   Dicționar Român

  • fault — ► NOUN 1) an unattractive or unsatisfactory feature; a defect or mistake. 2) responsibility for an accident or misfortune. 3) (in tennis) a service that infringes the rules. 4) Geology an extended break in a rock formation, marked by the relative …   English terms dictionary

  • Fault — Fault, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Faulted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Faulting}.] 1. To charge with a fault; to accuse; to find fault with; to blame. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] For that I will not fault thee. Old Song. [1913 Webster] 2. (Geol.) To interrupt the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fault´i|ly — fault|y «FL tee», adjective, fault|i|er, fault|i|est. 1. having faults; containing blemishes or errors; wrong; imperfect; defective: » …   Useful english dictionary

  • fault|y — «FL tee», adjective, fault|i|er, fault|i|est. 1. having faults; containing blemishes or errors; wrong; imperfect; defective: » …   Useful english dictionary


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